U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre

This Anti-Corruption Helpdesk brief was produced in response to a query from a U4 Partner Agency. The U4 Helpdesk is operated by Transparency International in collaboration with the U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre based at the Chr. Michelsen Institute.

Query

What is the status of published information on corruption and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in Africa? What is the status of published information on illicit or unreported financial flows related to corruption in the fishery sector? Who are the actors working to counteract illicit and unreported financial flows?

Purpose


There are plans to increase the support to the fishery sector, and at the same there is a lack of available information for staff related to the fishery sector and illicit/unreported financial flows from the same sector.


Content


1. Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing: overview
2. Linkages between IUU fishing and corruption
3. Evidence of illicit flows and actors working to counter illicit financial flows related to IUU fishing
4. References


Caveat


There is little research on the relationship between IUU fishing and corruption. Research on illegal financial flows related to corruption in fisheries is even scarcer.

Summary


There is very limited publicly available information on corruption and illegal, unreported and unregulated fisheries in Africa. Corruption in fisheries is still an under-researched area although it is known that IUU fishing is most likely to happen and also more detrimental in countries where governance is weak and corruption is rampant, including in many African countries.


There is evidence that corruption takes many forms and facilitates IUU fishing in Africa throughout the fisheries chain. From the payment of bribes to use prohibited fishing gear or to continue fishing in illegal areas without punishment, to conflicts of interest between law enforcement officials and IUU fishers, corruption is hampering law enforcement in Africa and allowing IUU fishers to operate to the detriment of small-scale fishers, the environment and citizens in general. Information on illicit financial flows related to corruption in the fisheries sector is also very scarce. But a few actors, such as the OECD, and INTERPOL have demonstrated interest in working on related issues.

Authors

Maíra Martini, Transparency International, tihelpdesk@transparency.org

Date

05/09/2013

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